Archive for the ‘Chicago Police Department’ category

New Data Snapshot: Juvenile Justice in Illinois

April 30, 2014

Today, we are releasing a new report that provides an overview of juvenile justice in Illinois. This is not a research report but is intended to offer a brief primer for those who want to better understand how many young people across the state come to the attention of the criminal punishment system.

Download the report HERE (PDF).

by Richard Ross (Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center)

by Richard Ross (Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center)

Chain Reaction: A Youth-driven, Multimedia Storytelling Project Promoting Alternatives to Calling the Police

January 16, 2014

We are excited to share this new paper by Sarah Brewster and Jane Hereth who were both volunteers with our Chain Reaction, youth-driven participatory action research project. Sarah and Jane have written about the project and their particular experiences with it.

“The authors detail their work with Chain Reaction, a Chicago-based participatory action research and popular education project working to spark conversations about alternatives to calling the police on young people. As volunteers for Chain Reaction, we facilitated a series of workshops an LGBTQ youth center in which youth used digital audio recorders to interview each other about their experiences with police, then curated the stories for a toolkit on alternatives to policing. As the stories consistently reflect, when young people become involved with the police, it often sets off a chain reaction that can result in dropping out of school, losing jobs, and ongoing contact with state systems. The goal of Chain Reaction is to support community-based strategies for stopping these cycles. We explore the theoretical frameworks and the limitations and successes of the project, and offer suggestions for those interested in doing similar projects.”

You can download the paper HERE.

New Fact Sheets: Chicago School-to-Prison Pipeline

October 27, 2013

In advance of the Week of Action against School Pushout, Project NIA created a fact sheet including data about suspensions, school-based arrests, and other information.

You can find the complete fact sheet HERE (PDF).

Our volunteer Jacqui Shine generously created a set of visually appealing fact sheets based on the data. We are grateful for her contributions to our work.

suspensions-FS-2-page-001

One Page Fact Sheets:

1. Chicago School-Based Arrests (PDF)

2. Chicago Suspensions (PDF)

3. Dropouts and incarceration (PDF)

4. LGBT statistics and Restorative Justice Facts (PDF)

Fact Sheet: Youth School-Based Arrests at Chicago Public Schools (2012)

October 1, 2013

Special thanks to our supporter Jacqui Shine for designing this fact sheet based on our most recent data report about school-based arrests on CPS properties.

arrests-FS-1-page-001

You can download a PDF of the fact sheet HERE.

Memes Based on CPS School-Based Youth Arrest Report

September 30, 2013

Our friends at the Native Youth Sexual Health Network created some memes for us based on findings from our recent report “Policing Chicago Public Schools 2” about youth arrests on CPS properties (2011 & 2012). We have been using the memes on social media to raise awareness during the National Week of Action Against School Pushout.

Slide2(1)

Slide1(2)

Slide4

Juvenile Arrests in Chicago – Key Findings from Two New Reports

August 5, 2013

Over the past few months, Project NIA has been working on several reports about juvenile arrests in Chicago. In May, we released a second edition of our Policing Chicago Public Schools report that focused on data about school based arrests in 2011 & 2012.

Today, we are releasing two reports.

The first focuses on trends in Chicago juvenile arrests from 2009 to 2012. It was written by Ashley Cook, Zygmunt Czykieta, Paul Mack, and Chris Skrable (with contributions by Mariame Kaba). Ashley, Ziggy, Paul and Chris undertook this research as part of an Introduction to GIS course taught by Dr. Mike Stiehl at Loyola University this spring. You can download the report HERE.

The second report is an updated version of our Arresting Justice report that we published in 2011. The new report focuses on Chicago juvenile arrests in 2011 & 2012. You can download it HERE.

Below is a summary of the key findings from both reports. We hope that you find this data useful as you work to decrease young people’s contact with the police.

Juvenile Arrests in Chicago (2012) – Key Findings at a Glance… by Mariame Kaba, Project NIA

  1. According to the Chicago Police Department (CPD), there were 22,877 arrests of youth 17 and under in 2012 (some youth may be arrested more than once). This represents a nearly 27% decline in juvenile arrests since 2009. (Arresting Justice 2, 8/13)
  2.  In 2012, black youth accounted for 79% of juvenile arrests in Chicago (Arresting Justice 2, 8/13)
  3. Expressed in per capita rates, in 2012, black youth were arrested 7.6 times per 100 youth, five times more frequently than Hispanic youth (1.5 arrests per 100 youth) and TEN times more frequently than white youth (0.7 arrests per 100 youth). (Cook, Czykieta, Mack,  Skrable, & Kaba 8/13)
  4. For the first time, we present a district by district breakdown of percentages of specific racial populations compared to the percentage of arrests constituted by members of that racial group.

Racial Breakdown of Percentage of Youth & Arrests by District (2012)

District

% Black Youth

Black % of Youth Arrests

% White Youth

White % of Youth Arrests

% Hispanic Youth

Hispanic % of Youth Arrests

1

32.70%

89.50%

35.10%

2.50%

9.01%

6.84%

2

81.60%

96.90%

8.25%

0.68%

3.48%

1.45%

3

94.40%

99.30%

1.10%

0.30%

2.05%

0.22%

4

59.90%

86.10%

3.28%

1.22%

35.40%

12.10%

5

95%

98.90%

0.32%

0.31%

3.95%

0.77%

6

97.10%

99.50%

0.19%

0.08%

1.51%

0.15%

7

96.70%

99.90%

0.14%

0.07%

1.92%

0.07%

8

19.90%

59.60%

9.23%

4.83%

69.40%

35.20%

9

12.80%

52.90%

6.63%

6.12%

69.50%

40.50%

10

29.50%

61.60%

0.92%

1.05%

69.10%

37.10%

11

84.80%

98.10%

0.93%

0.22%

12.90%

1.49%

12

23.30%

52%

11.30%

1.57%

59.40%

46.30%

13

25.10%

70.50%

24.50%

3.41%

36.50%

26.10%

14

10.60%

35.10%

18.90%

6.44%

66.50%

57.80%

15

93%

99.50%

0.71%

0.14%

4.93%

0.41%

16

1.10%

17.50%

55.40%

39.50%

35.10%

40.80%

17

3.48%

28%

25.80%

13.10%

57.70%

57.30%

18

21.10%

91.50%

60.10%

2.58%

7.01%

4.94%

19

11.80%

60.50%

61.70%

14.80%

16.30%

23.50%

20

12.90%

69.80%

34.80%

0%

32.20%

29.40%

22

60.50%

95%

32.40%

3.61%

5.19%

1.29%

24

20.40%

70.70%

27.20%

4.41%

32.10%

22.50%

25

15.40%

46.80%

6.07%

4%

76.50%

48.80%

Black youth are arrested in greater proportion than their populations represent throughout the entire city. Hispanic youth are arrested in greater proportions in a few districts on the Northside and white youth are arrested in smaller proportions than their population throughout the entire city. (Cook, Czykieta, Mack, Skrable, & Kaba, 8/13)

5. In Chicago, boys/young men were 84% of juvenile arrests in 2012 (Arresting Justice 2, 8/13).

6. More juvenile arrests in Chicago were for misdemeanor offenses (74%) in 2012 (Arresting Justice 2, 8/13).

7. In 2012, most of the juvenile arrests (64.5%) in Chicago were concentrated in 10 districts. In order of most arrests, these districts are 8, 11, 7, 15, 4, 3, 6, 5, 9, and 10 (Arresting Justice 2, 8/13).

8. There were 1,080 formal and 6,149 informal stations adjustments[1] reported by the Chicago Police Department in 2012 (Arresting Justice 2, 8/13)

Sources:

Kaba, Mariame (2013) Arresting Justice (Second Edition): Juvenile Arrests in Chicago, 2011 and 2012.

Cook, Czykieta, Mack, Skrable & Kaba (2013) Trends in Chicago Juvenile Arrests, 2009-2012.


[1] As an alternative to referring the case to Juvenile Court, a youth officer may release a young person from custody with a station adjustment. There are two types of station adjustments: informal and formal. A youth officer may give an informal station adjustment if he/she decides there is probable cause to believe the juvenile committed an offense. A formal station adjustment is different in that a juvenile must also admit involvement in the alleged offense. The juvenile’s admission can later be used as evidence against him/her if they violate the terms of the formal adjustment and his case is referred to court.

Although they are not convictions, station adjustments usually appear in a juvenile’s arrest history. All formal station adjustments must be recorded with the Illinois State Police. Informal station adjustments for felonies must also be recorded with the Illinois State Police, and informal station adjustments for misdemeanors may be recorded. Station adjustments can be expunged from a juvenile’s record.

Maps: Rate of Change in Juvenile Arrests, 2009-2012

June 4, 2013

We are looking forward to releasing a new report about trends in Chicago juvenile arrests from 2009-2012 in the next few weeks. The report is written by students who were participants in an introductory GIS course taught by Dr. Mike Stiehl at Loyola University. The students are Ashley Cook, Zygmunt Czykieta, Paul Mack, and Chris Skrable and they created the following maps to illustrate the rate of change of juvenile arrests by district.  We have already shared information about the overall decline of 26.7% in juvenile arrests since 2009. Now we have these terrific maps to add more detail to the overall trend. We greatly appreciate our partnership with the students and are grateful for their important and excellent work.

(May 2013)

(May 2013)

The next three maps are broken out according the race (white, black, and latin@)

(May 2013)

(May 2013)

(May 2013)

(May 2013)

(May 2013)

(May 2013)

New Report: Youth School-Based Arrests in Chicago Public Schools, 2011 & 2012

May 29, 2013

Announcing the Release of “Policing Chicago Public Schools 2:” A New Report about School-Based Youth Arrests in Chicago 2011 and 2012

Project NIA (www.project-nia.org) has released a new report titled “Policing Chicago Public Schools 2: School-Based Arrests 2011 and 2012.” The report relies on data from the Chicago Police Department (CPD) to show the types of offenses and the demographics (gender, age and race) of the youth arrested on CPS properties in calendar years 2011 & 2012.  The report builds upon the 2010 data that we presented in January 2012.

by Rachel Marie-Crane Williams (2011)

by Rachel Marie-Crane Williams (2011)

CPD reports its data by police district rather than by individual school so this year we also worked with students from Loyola University to create an interactive application that allows individuals to search for crime and arrest data by school for the 2011-2012 school year too.

The key data points in the report are that:

  1. Overall youth school-based arrests have been decreasing. In 2010, over 5,500 arrests of young people under 18 years old took place on CPS properties. In 2011, the number of youth school-based arrests (18 & under) was 4,959 and in 2012, it was 4,287.
  2. Black youth are still disproportionately targeted by these arrests. While they represent about 42% of CPS students, black youth accounted for 75.5% percent of school-based arrests in 2012.  This mirrors the general trend of disproportionate minority contact within the juvenile legal system.
  3. In 2012, young men were more likely to be arrested on CPS properties than were their female counterparts [68% vs. 32%].
  4. Most youth school-based arrests are for misdemeanor offenses (84%) as opposed to felonies (16%).
  5. In 2012, 86% of youth school-based arrests happened in school buildings while 14% took place on school grounds.
  6. In 2012, the top three aggregate numbers of youth school-based arrests are in the 8th, 5th, and 4th police districts.  Together these three districts account for 30% of total youth school-based arrests on CPS properties.

This report was developed and written by Mariame Kaba and Eva Nagao. To access the full report, visit the Policing Chicago Public Schools 2 site HERE.


New Fact Sheet & Interactive Map: Arrests on Chicago Public Schools Properties 2011 and 2012

April 29, 2013
print by Sara Atlas for Black & Blue Exhibition (3/13)

print by Sarah Atlas for Black & Blue Exhibition (3/13)

Last January (2012), we published a report titled “Policing Chicago Public Schools.” The report relied on data from the Chicago Police Department (CPD) to show (for the first time in seven years) the type of offenses and the demographics (gender, age and race) of the juveniles arrested on Chicago Public Schools (CPS) property in calendar year 2010.

We are currently working to update this report by publishing data from the Chicago Police Department about youth arrests (18 & under) on CPS property in calendar years 2011 and 2012. In the meantime, we are pleased to share a preview of that report today through the following FACT SHEET. The fact sheet offers preliminary data including the gender, age, and race of the youth (18 & under) arrested on CPS property in 2011 and 2012. New this year, we have broken the data out according to arrests on school grounds and in school buildings.

20130428082738

Our final report will be available in late summer.

Additionally, we are excited to share a wonderful interactive map that was created by Chris Skrable featuring information about crimes and arrests on CPS properties for the 2011-2012 academic year. This map only includes crimes and arrests that took place during the school day between 8 am and 5 pm. The map allows you to search by school by simply typing the name of your school in the search bar at the top right of the page. If searching for Kilmer Elementary for example, type: Kilmer Elementary, Chicago [Don't forget to include Chicago so that it can direct you to the appropriate location].

Once you find your school on the map, click on it and you will see demographic, crime, and arrest data. Importantly, the data is presented as a ratio per 100 students which allows for comparisons between schools. Finally, you can play around with the zoom feature on the map located on the left side. We thank Chris for his hard work on this terrific resource. Chris created the map as part of a GIS course taught by Dr. Mike Steihl at Loyola University. We are excited to share the other maps created by other students in our upcoming reports about juvenile arrests in Chicago that will be published in late summer and in the fall.

You can find the interactive map HERE.

Let us know what you think about these new resources in the comments section below or by emailing us at chiyouthjustice@gmail.com. We are always happy to get feedback about our work and appreciate hearing how our resources are being used!

Promising Trend: Juvenile Arrests in Chicago Continue to Decrease

April 11, 2013

Juvenile Arrests (17 and Under, City of Chicago, 2009-2012)

2009

2010

2011

2012

% change

31,224

27,563

25,111

22,877

-26.7%

Source: CPD Research and Development Division, Research and Analysis Section

There has been a continuing decrease in the number of juvenile arrests (youth 17 and under) in Chicago. Since 2009, juvenile arrests in the city have dropped by 26.7%.  Stay tuned for our upcoming report which will update Arresting Justice that was released in 2011 and includes data from 2009 & 2010. The new report includes data from 2011 and 2012 and will be released in early September.


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