New Report: Rogers Park Juvenile Justice Snapshot 2010

Community members need timely and accessible information about how youth are faring in their neighborhoods.  Such data provides a platform for advocacy and organizing to redress social problems.  Our first Rogers Park Juvenile Justice Data Snapshot was released in November 2010 and mostly included data from 2009.

Today, we are pleased to release our second Rogers Park Juvenile Justice Snapshot which primarily relies on 2010 data to describe the plight of youth in conflict with the law in our community.  We believe this publication will provide our local educators, policymakers, parents, and community members with a deeper understanding of the issues facing Rogers Park youth.

We hope that our community will join us as we mobilize to dramatically decrease the arrest, detention, and general juvenile justice system involvement of our young people.

Thanks go out to John Bentley, Andrew Fernandez, Cait Patterson, and Jennifer Welch for their help with data collection. Special thanks to Chez Rumpf and others at the Center for Urban Research and Learning for their support in creating this report!

Key findings from the report include:

1. According the Chicago Police Department (CPD), there were 708 total arrests of youth 17 and under in 2010 in the 24th district. The 24th district had the seventeenth highest number of juvenile arrests in 2010. In 2010, 71 arrests happened on public school grounds in the 24th district.

2. In Chicago, more youth are arrested for misdemeanors than felony crimes. The same is true in the 24th district where the top three misdemeanor offenses in 2010 were: miscellaneous non-index offenses, drug abuse violations, and simple battery.

3. In 2010, detectives in the 24th district issued 21 formal station adjustments and 171 informal station adjustments for a total of 192 station adjustments.

4. Based on data from the Juvenile Probation and Court Services Department, in 2010, there were 19,726 court referrals in Cook County. In the 24th district, 449 juveniles were referred by law enforcement to the Office of the State’s Attorney in 2010.

5. The clear majority of juveniles (61%) referred to the State’s Attorney from detectives in the 24th district were 16 and 17 years old.

6. Based on data from the Juvenile Probation and Court Services Department, in 2010, 7,375 juvenile petitions filed in the Circuit Court of Cook County. In the 24th district, the Office of the State’s Attorney filed 165 delinquency petitions with the court in 2010.

7. There were 49 juveniles with active formal supervision/probation cases in 2010 and 52 juveniles with informal supervision/probation cases in the 24th district. 78% of those with active formal supervision/probation cases were African-American and 86% were male. The majority of these youth (70) were 15 and 16 years old.

8. Based on Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center (CCJTDC) data, there were 44 admissions from the 60626 zip code and 21 admissions from the 60645 zip code from January through August 2011. This means that Rogers Park youth accounted for an insignificant percentage of total admissions to the detention center over that time period.

9. Data was not specifically available for youth committed to the Department of Juvenile Justice (youth prisons) from the 24th district. We were however able to secure data from the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority (ICJIA) about Rogers Park youth who were admitted to parole in FY11. An ICJIA analysis shows that 11 Rogers Park youth were admitted to parole in FY11.

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